Pegah Afra, MD, Epileptologist  Assistant Professor (Interim), Dept. of Neurology, Weill Cornell Medicine

Pegah Afra, MD, Epileptologist
Assistant Professor (Interim),
Dept. of Neurology,
Weill Cornell Medicine

“A timeless work…there is a large population of patients with psychosomatic disease that can benefit from this… it is so important that people know that such [healing] paths exist in life.”

 

  Patricia A. Gibson, MSW, DHL, ACSW  Associate Professor, Neurology Wake Forest Medical School

Patricia A. Gibson, MSW, DHL, ACSW
Associate Professor, Neurology
Wake Forest Medical School

“...We all bring our own personal histories to the medical symptoms we display and, while it may not be addressed, it will not be ignored. For true healing to occur it, too, must be addressed...For the shocking numbers of women and men walking around in silence, trying to make sense of their symptoms resulting from various forms of abuse, this portrayal can offer hope and encouragement to speak their truth and seek help.”

  Anita Mandley, LCPC, SEP  Center for Contextual Change

Anita Mandley, LCPC, SEP
Center for Contextual Change

“...[this is] sacred work... There is such a visceral power and  I am quite sure that this play can enlighten and empower many, many survivors, as well as give them hope that, given the right conditions, their wounds will heal.  It is a real testament to the resilience of the human spirit even in the presence of profound suffering.”

“We recognize that all knowledge is mediated through the body and that feeling is a profound source of information about our lives.” (Audre Lorde)
 

  Jane Wilkins, PhD  ("Dr. Jane") Independent Practitioner, New York City

Jane Wilkins, PhD ("Dr. Jane")
Independent Practitioner, New York City

As “Dr. Jane,” the real life SE (Somatic Experiencing) Touch psychotherapist portrayed in The Trauma Brain Project, it is enormously gratifying and hopeful to speak with people after they have experienced this potent dialog. A common theme is how they identified with Dayle Ann's suffering and confusion about enduring physical and emotional symptoms that made no sense, about the agony of feeling misunderstood, and the persistence of shame as they also felt the need to remain hidden. Most uplifting to viewers is Dayle Ann's determination to heal, and how she intuitively found her way to a bodily-oriented therapist who helped her unleash trauma, regain, renew and/or establish a true sense of herself and connect with others with a new perspective. Emancipation! The inspiring message that comes across is how, along with an attuned therapist, body awareness helps frame one's psychological abilities to look within, sense within and be within.... emotional competence through embodiment.
If victims of trauma could find their way to this treatment of choice – after all, trauma is in the body, not the event – what would be possible?! If health care professionals could recognize that the origin of a certain cluster of symptoms was due to trauma, imagine the possibilities for healing!

  Ann Marie Collier, MD  Neurologist, Integrative Epileptologist St. Mary's Hospital Epilepsy Program  

Ann Marie Collier, MD
Neurologist, Integrative Epileptologist
St. Mary's Hospital Epilepsy Program
 

"The Trauma Brain Project is more than a powerful performance...The project should be mandatory viewing for medical students... a cathartic program that needs to become part of the conversation not only in healthcare, but in society as a whole. The Trauma Brain Project is a catalyst for change."

  Bianka Hardin, Psy.D., SE  Owner, Centered Therapy Chicago  

Bianka Hardin, Psy.D., SE
Owner, Centered Therapy Chicago
 

"I am honored to be a part of this amazing project. The performance is riveting and speaks to the resilience of the human spirit and the body's wisdom in the healing process. Survivors have the innate capacity to heal, given the right circumstances. This performance breaks a conspiracy of silence and gives voice and community to victims of abuse. It is important to know that survivors are not alone and there is healing in sharing your story."

 

  Amy Zajakowski Uhll, LCPC  Director, Chicago Center for Integration and Healing

Amy Zajakowski Uhll, LCPC
Director, Chicago Center for
Integration and Healing

The Trauma Brain Project is a beautifully written, beautifully performed play about the powerful effects of childhood trauma and the incredible wisdom of the body in the healing process. I had the honor of participating in the expert panel discussion after the performance last night. I was again moved by the performance and grateful for the courage and vulnerability of the playwright..."

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